Francis Gazeau, an adventurer with a big heart

Francis Gazeau during his year of voluntary isolation on the atoll of Tahanea - © L. PesquiéFrancis Gazeau during his year of voluntary isolation on the atoll of Tahanea - © L. PesquiéFrancis Gazeau during his year of voluntary isolation on the atoll of Tahanea - © L. PesquiéFrancis Gazeau during his year of voluntary isolation on the atoll of Tahanea - © L. PesquiéFrancis Gazeau during his year of voluntary isolation on the atoll of Tahanea - © L. PesquiéFrancis Gazeau during his year of voluntary isolation on the atoll of Tahanea - © L. PesquiéDuring his year of isolation, Francis Gazeau received visits of a medical team - © L. Pesquié
Francis Gazeau, an adventurer with a big heart
5/5 - 4 vote(s)

French Polynesian Francis Gazeau is one of those people who elicits respect due to his courage and actions. To say that his entire life has always been extraordinary would not be entirely true; but he can certainly be praised for the noble example he has set since his heart transplant ten years ago. Today, this seventy-year-old accomplishes amazing feats to spread awareness about organ donation. His next challenge: one year alone on Clipperton Island.

On April 21, 2004, Francis Gazeau received a heart transplant. After years on a waiting list for a heart, this was a rebirth and a chance at a second life for this senior citizen. Gazeau honors the amazing gift he received in the most beautiful way. He became the ambassador for organ donation in French Polynesia through engaging in extraordinary challenges to spread awareness about this generous lifesaving act. For the fifth anniversary of his transplant, and in the spirit of a modern day Robinson Crusoe, Francis Gazeau left to live on a motu off Tahanea atoll in the Tuamotus. This was an international first made possible through the assurance of his doctors, the support of sponsors, and his unswerving faith in life.

Then he crossed the Tuamotu Archipelago in his outrigger fishing canoe, Takoa, that he transformed into a skiff with a rudder, a mast, a sail, a second outrigger and trampoline nets. This odyssey in a sailing canoe was an opportunity to promote the Tuamotus and highlight French Polynesia while spreading his message. Each of his epic adventures calls for a documentary, for Francis Gazeau’s determination, confidence, and courage are intriguing and captivating. Already, his exploits would be deemed out of the ordinary for someone in excellent physical condition, never mind someone who underwent a heart transplant.

In order to celebrate the tenth anniversary of his life in symbiosis with a new heart, this man will again push the limits of the mind and medicine. Gazeau will exile himself for an entire year on Clipperton Island, the most isolated French atoll in the world. Located in the Northern Pacific about 1,300 km (808 mi) to the west of Mexico, it is about 5,600 km (3,480 mi) from Tahiti. No one has tread ground on Clipperton Island for that long and to be there alone is a first in the world.

Clipperton Island: a crazy challenge for Gazeau

This island has always fascinated Gazeau. Today, this island is dying and he hopes to breathe new life into it through broadcasting live lessons to French Polynesian children about its ecosystem. How timely that his dream will coincide with the tenth anniversary of his transplant! Clipperton Island is 4 km long (2.5 mi) and 3km wide (1.5 mi) with an area of 4.6 sq mi. The French discovered the atoll in 1711. It became the site of scientific expeditions, but they had nothing in common with Gazeau’s plan. To get to Clipperton, Gazeau will embark on a French Navy ship in January or February, 2015.   

Before arranging this, he had to convince the French government to bestow him with the status of volunteer representative of France, which assures him an extraction back home in case of any problems. Thereafter, the organization of his stay remains the same as it was on the deserted Tahanea atoll. After six months, a team of scientists will come and make sure Gazeau is in good physical health. Although he will be less cut off from the world than he was on Tahanea, thanks to the long distance environmental conferences he will be conducting, Gazeau will nonetheless not be there without risk. 

Self-sufficient living

However, Clipperton is not a very welcoming island. There are frequent storms and the fish abandoned the lagoon. With its semi-tropical climate, this island gets about 10-15 violent storms per year. Storms and rain are to be expected. This is a first for Gazeau, who was relatively protected during his retreat to the Tuamotus. Further, in order to get ready for his expedition, this adventurer is collecting advice and information while preparing mentally. He needs to bring in all the food he needs to survive since he cannot rely on the scarce marine resources. At least Clipperton atoll has a small coconut grove. Besides this local food supply, Gazeau will bring miki miki (a shrub common along the Tuamotuan coastline that is very resistant to salinity) and fruit trees. He will plant more coconut trees. He wants to give this dying islet new life through becoming Clipperton’s master gardener for a year.

After much thought about what would be the most efficient means of transport to sail Clipperton’s large lagoon, Gazeau traded in his traditional outrigger pirogue, or va’a , for a hobie cat (a small catamaran). He will build two shelters. The first will be in the coconut grove, and the other on the island’s highest point, a volcanic rock 29 meters high (95 ft) that emerges from the lagoon on the southeast side of the atoll. From there, Gazeau will have a survival and surveillance post. Before spending a year alone, this seventy-year-old adventurer will have company for the 15 days he will spend on the ship with the French Navy; which is the length of time it will take to get to Clipperton. They will stay on the island for four days to help get Gazeau situated and to assure he has everything he needs. Then…the adventure will truly begin!

Valentine Labrousse

Kidney transplants are the new French Polynesian challenge.

Organ donations impact us all, for all of us may someday either need a transplant or become a donor. It is therefore critical to discuss the issue with loved ones and to let them know our take on the matter. Since 2013 in French Polynesia, kidney transplants take place, although donations are rare. This is not only due to a lack of knowledge about the issue, but also tenacious religious beliefs. This is why Francis Gazeau spreads a positive message about organ donations in French Polynesia through connecting with the people and taking on exceptional challenges. What motivates him is to honor his donor and the 35-year-old heart that beats in his chest. Each day is a joy as long as he follows certain rules: to respect his medical treatment, to respect his transplant through healthy living, and to respect the opinions of others as far as organ donation.

Gazeau’s exploits turned into documentaries

His first solitary adventure on Tahanea atoll was retraced and immortalized with the film, Les as de cœur (Champions of the Heart). The second aventure, which involved crossing the Tuamotu Archipelago in a sailing pirogue, received a lot more coverage because Gazeau was followed by teams from the magazine Thalassa (a well-known journal dedicated to the ocean

and broadcast over a popular French public television channel), Bleu Lagon productions (a video production company) and Grand Angle (a French video/documentary production company). La pirogue du cœur (Pirogue of the heart) was broadcast throughout France and French Polynesia. Each challenge releases a film over Gazeau’s exploits, which allows for even more exchanges and connections. 

A book over Tahanea

Always hoping to spread awareness about organ donation to large audiences, Francis Gazeau will release a book over his 2009 adventure on Tahanea atoll. The manuscript, written by Gilles Anziluti and published in France with a preface by Professor Christian Cabrol, a renowned French cardiologist, is almost finished. Part of the proceeds from the book will benefit Dr. Cabrol’s charities.

Francis Gazeau, an adventurer with a big heart
-
French Polynesian Francis Gazeau is one of those people who elicits respect due to his courage and actions. To say that his entire life has always been extraordinary would not be entirely true; but he can certainly be praised for the noble example he has set since his heart transplant ten years ago. Today, this seventy-year-old accomplishes amazing feats to spread awareness about organ donation. His next challenge: one year alone on Clipperton Island.
-
-
Welcome Tahiti
-
Francis Gazeau, l’aventurier au grand cœur
5/5 - 3 vote(s)

Il est des hommes qui forcent le respect par leur courage et leurs actions, le Polynésien Francis Gazeau en fait partie. Dire qu’il a été remarquable toute sa vie serait sûrement faux, mais louer son exemplarité et sa noblesse depuis sa greffe de cœur, 10 ans auparavant, est plus juste. Ce septuagénaire accomplit aujourd’hui des défis d’exception pour sensibiliser au don d’organes. Le prochain en date : un an en solitaire sur l’île de Clipperton.

Le 21 avril 2004, Francis Gazeau est greffé du cœur. Pour ce senior en attente depuis des années, c’est une renaissance et une seconde vie. Cette chance incroyable qui lui est offerte, Francis l’honore de la plus belle des manières. Il se fait l’ambassadeur du don d’organes en Polynésie, et sensibilise la population à ce geste généreux et salvateur via des défis extraordinaires. Pour l’anniversaire des 5 ans de sa greffe, Francis Gazeau partit vivre une année durant, tel un Robinson Crusoé moderne, sur l’un des motu de l’atoll de Tahanea dans l’archipel des Tuamotu. Une première mondiale rendue possible par la confiance de ses médecins, des partenaires et de son indéfectible foi en la vie.

Puis vint la traversée des Tuamotu en pirogue à voile, sur un esquif transformé par ses soins : Takoa, en fait sa pirogue de pêche, agrémentée d’un safran, d’un mât, d’une voile, d’un second balancier et de trampolines. Cette odyssée en pirogue à voile fut l’occasion de promouvoir les Tuamotu, de faire rayonner la Polynésie tout en diffusant son message. Chaque épopée est l’occasion d’un documentaire. Car Francis Gazeau intrigue et passionne par sa détermination, sa confiance et son courage. Les exploits qu’il accomplit sont déjà hors norme pour un homme en excellente condition physique, ils le sont encore plus pour un greffé.

Afin de célébrer les 10 ans de vie en symbiose avec son nouveau cœur, l’homme repousse une nouvelle fois les limites de son mental et de la médecine. Il va s’exiler durant une année sur l’île de Clipperton, l’atoll français le plus isolé du monde situé dans le Pacifique Nord à quelques 1 300 km à l’ouest des côtes mexicaines et à environ 5 600 Km de l’île de Tahiti. Aucun humain n’a foulé Clipperton aussi longtemps et seul… une première mondiale, à nouveau.

Clipperton, le défi fou de Francis

Cette île a toujours fasciné Francis. Aujourd’hui elle se meurt et il compte bien lui redonner vie en promouvant son écosystème auprès d’enfants Polynésiens, au travers d’actions pédagogiques ponctuelles. Quelle belle symbolique que de concrétiser ce rêve pour fêter les 10 ans de sa greffe. Clipperton, c’est 4 km de long et 3 de large, soit 12 km2 de circonférence. L’atoll, découvert par les Français en 1711, a fait l’objet d’expéditions scientifiques, mais rien de commun avec ce que s’apprête à faire Francis Gazeau. Pour atteindre Clipperton, Francis embarquera dès janvier ou février 2015 sur un navire de la marine nationale. Avant cela, il lui aura fallu convaincre le gouvernement français de lui attribuer le statut de représentant bénévole de la France ce qui lui confère, entre autres, l’assurance d’un rapatriement en cas de problèmes. Ensuite, l’organisation reste la même que sur l’atoll désert de Tahanea : au bout de 6 mois, une mission scientifique viendra vérifier la bonne santé physique de Francis. Moins coupé du monde que sur l’atoll de Tahanea grâce aux conférences environnementales qu’il organisera à distance, Francis n’en sera pas moins mis à l’épreuve pour autant.

Une vie en autarcie

Clipperton est pourtant peu accueillante, avec des tempêtes fréquentes et un lagon déserté par les poissons. Dotée d’un climat semi-tropical, l’île connaît 10 à 15 tempêtes violentes en moyenne par an. Vents et pluies sont alors au rendez-vous. Ceci est une première pour Francis, jusqu’alors relativement préservé dans son ermitage des Tuamotu. Aussi, pour préparer au mieux son expédition, l’aventurier engrange conseils, informations, et entretient son mental. Il devra emporter sa nourriture s’il veut survivre, ne pouvant compter sur les rares ressources marines. L’atoll de Clipperton accueille néanmoins une petite cocoteraie. En dehors de cette denrée locale, Francis Gazeau y emportera des miki miki (arbuste très résistant à la salinité et commun sur les rivages des Tuamotu) et des arbres fruitiers. Il s’occupera à planter davantage de cocotiers. Il veut redonner vie à cette île mourante, se faisant le grand jardinier de Clipperton pendant un an.

Afin de naviguer dans son vaste lagon, Francis a échangé son va’a, sa pirogue traditionnelle polynésienne à un balancier contre un hobie cat (petit catamaran), ayant longtemps réfléchi au moyen de transport qui sera le plus efficace une fois sur place. Question abri, il s’en construira deux. Le premier sera dans la cocoteraie, l’autre sur le point culminant de l’île, un rocher volcanique de 29 mètres de hauteur qui émerge du lagon au sud-est de l’atoll. De là, Francis aura un poste de survie et de surveillance. Avant de passer son année en solitaire, l’aventurier septuagénaire aura de la compagnie puisqu’il naviguera durant 15 jours avec les militaires français, le temps de rejoindre Clipperton. Ceux-ci resteront alors 4 jours afin de s’assurer que Francis a pu s’installer correctement et qu’il ne manque de rien. Ensuite, et bien… l’aventure commencera vraiment !

Valentine Labrousse

La greffe de rein, nouveau défi polynésien

Le don d’organes nous concerne tous, car nous pourrions un jour avoir besoin d’une greffe ou bien devenir donneur. Il est donc important d’en discuter avec nos proches, leur faire savoir notre position sur le sujet. En Polynésie, depuis 2013, la greffe de rein est pratiquée bien que les dons soient rares. Les croyances religieuses sont tenaces, quant il ne s’agit tout simplement pas d’une méconnaissance de cette possibilité. C’est pourquoi Francis Gazeau véhicule un message positif sur le don d’organes en Polynésie, allant au contact des populations et réalisant des défis d’exception. Sa motivation : honorer son donneur et ce cœur de 35 ans qui bat dans sa poitrine. Chaque jour est un bonheur, à condition de respecter certaines règles : respecter son traitement, respecter son greffon via une bonne hygiène de vie, respecter les idées des autres sur le don d’organes.

Les exploits de Francis en format “documentaire”

La première aventure en solitaire sur l’atoll de Tahanea fut immortalisée et retracée au travers du film Les as de cœur. La seconde aventure, la traversée des Tuamotu en pirogue à voile, a été fut beaucoup plus médiatisée puisque Francis était suivi par les équipes de Thalassa (magazine bien connu sur le thème de la mer et diffusé sur une grande chaine publique française), de Bleu lagon production et Grand Angle. Le documentaire La pirogue du cœur a été diffusé en France métropolitaine ainsi qu’en Polynésie. À chaque défi, Francis diffuse le film de ses exploits, l’occasion d’échanges et de contacts supplémentaires.

Un livre sur Tahanea

Souhaitant toujours sensibiliser un large public au don d’organes, Francis Gazeau va publier un livre sur son aventure de 2009 sur l’atoll de Tahanea. Le manuscrit est quasiment achevé, préfacé par le professeur Christian Cabrol, cardiologue français de renom, écrit par Gilles Anziluti et publié en Métropole. Une partie des recettes du livre seront reversées à l’association du professeur Cabrol.

Francis Gazeau, l'aventurier au grand cœur
-
Il est des hommes qui forcent le respect par leur courage et leurs actions, le Polynésien Francis Gazeau en fait partie. Dire qu’il a été remarquable toute sa vie serait sûrement faux, mais louer son exemplarité et sa noblesse depuis sa greffe de cœur, 10 ans auparavant, est plus juste. Ce septuagénaire accomplit aujourd'hui des défis d’exception pour sensibiliser au don d’organes. Le prochain en date : un an en solitaire sur l’île de Clipperton.
-
-
Welcome Tahiti
-